GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY EPIC COLLECTION: EARTH SHALL OVERCOME

Illustrated by Gene Colan, Marvel Various
Cover Design or Artwork by Al Milgrom
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Paperback
$39.99 US
6.61"W x 10.17"H x 0.6"D   | 21 oz | 18 per carton
On sale Apr 11, 2023 | 408 Pages | 9781302950439
| Rated T
FOC Jan 30, 2023 | Catalog December 2022
Movie Tie-In Edition
Welcome to the 31st century! A thousand years from now, Vance Astro, Yondu, Martinex and Charlie-27 - the original Guardians of the Galaxy - rise to retake the Solar System from reptilian raiders! And soon, the greatest heroes of the present day - Captain America, Doctor Strange, the Thing, the Hulk and more - will join the Guardians in the future's greatest war! Then, as the Guardians help society rebuild, threats arise from two worlds: one of them living, the other gone mad! The Guardians meet the flame-haired Nikki and the mysterious, all-knowing Starhawk, and the team faces a baptism of fire! Plus: Thor lends a hand against the all-powerful man-machine called Korvac! Collecting MARVEL SUPER-HEROES (1967) #18, MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE (1974) #4-5, GIANT-SIZE DEFENDERS #5, DEFENDERS (1972) #26-29, MARVEL PRESENTS #3-12 and THOR ANNUAL #6.
Arnold Drake (1924-2007) helped shape the Silver Age both at Marvel with Captain Marvel and X-Men; and at DC with Batman, Doom Patrol and “Stanley and His Monster.” His media tie-in work ranged from Star Trek to Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis. He wrote, produced and directed the 1964 horror film The Flesh Eaters, and wrote lyrics for several musicals. He won 1967 Alley Awards for Best Full-Length Story and Best New Strip (both for Deadman in Strange Adventures), as well as the Bill Finger Award for Excellence in Comics Writing.

Steve Gerber (1947-2008) first came to attention writing Defenders, in which he gave the non-team a non-traditional outlook equaled by few. In Adventure of Fear, he introduced Howard the Duck. Gerber’s other 1970s contributions included scripts for Iron Man, Sub-Mariner and more. Elsewhere, he is equally well-remembered for DC’s Phantom Zone, Eclipse’s Destroyer Duck and others.

Roger Stern enjoyed well-regarded runs on Amazing Spider-Man, in which he introduced Captain Marvel (Monica Rambeau) and the Hobgoblin; Avengers; and Captain America. He launched West Coast Avengers and wrote numerous tie-in miniseries starring Earth’s Mightiest Heroes. At DC, he relaunched Atom and co-created Starman (Will Payton) before participating in one of comics’ most shocking events: the 1992 “Death of Superman.” He later returned to Marvel to write Amazing Spider-Man and related titles.

The unique, shadowy style of Gene Colan (1926-2011) most memorably appeared in long stints on Captain America and Daredevil, and all 70 issues of Tomb of Dracula — among the dozens of other Marvel titles he has drawn. His DC work on Detective Comics and Night Force is equally well remembered. During the Golden Age, he drew multiple war stories for Marvel and DC alike. Colan has earned several Eagle Awards and had professional art showings in New York City. His work on Ed Brubaker’s Captain America at the age of 82 drew well-deserved raves.

After a start as inker to his older brother John, Sal Buscema penciled Captain America, Defenders, Incredible Hulk and more. Famed for his ability to meet tight deadlines, he spread his talents across multiple genres. His 1970s work ranged from Ms. Marvel and Nova to Sub-Mariner and Spider-Woman’s first appearance in Marvel Spotlight. He was the uninterrupted artist on Spectacular Spider-Man for more than 100 issues and penciled the web-slinger’s adventures in Marvel Team-Up, in which he and writer Bill Mantlo introduced Captain Jean DeWolff. After handling more team-ups in the Thing’s Marvel Two-in-One, he reunited with brother John on Steve Englehart’s Fantastic Four. He later provided inks for Tom DeFalco’s Spider-Girl titles and Thunderstrike miniseries.

Don Heck (1929-1995) worked for Harvey, Quality, Hillman and other publishers before arriving at Atlas Comics, later Marvel, where he penciled and inked stories for virtually every genre: crime, horror, jungle, romance, war, Western and more. With Stan Lee and others, he launched Iron Man, his supporting cast and his early rogues gallery — including the Black Widow, Hawkeye and the Mandarin. He also succeeded Jack Kirby on Avengers. At DC, his artwork appeared in Justice League of America, Flash, Wonder Woman and other titles.

About

Welcome to the 31st century! A thousand years from now, Vance Astro, Yondu, Martinex and Charlie-27 - the original Guardians of the Galaxy - rise to retake the Solar System from reptilian raiders! And soon, the greatest heroes of the present day - Captain America, Doctor Strange, the Thing, the Hulk and more - will join the Guardians in the future's greatest war! Then, as the Guardians help society rebuild, threats arise from two worlds: one of them living, the other gone mad! The Guardians meet the flame-haired Nikki and the mysterious, all-knowing Starhawk, and the team faces a baptism of fire! Plus: Thor lends a hand against the all-powerful man-machine called Korvac! Collecting MARVEL SUPER-HEROES (1967) #18, MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE (1974) #4-5, GIANT-SIZE DEFENDERS #5, DEFENDERS (1972) #26-29, MARVEL PRESENTS #3-12 and THOR ANNUAL #6.

Creators

Arnold Drake (1924-2007) helped shape the Silver Age both at Marvel with Captain Marvel and X-Men; and at DC with Batman, Doom Patrol and “Stanley and His Monster.” His media tie-in work ranged from Star Trek to Bob Hope and Jerry Lewis. He wrote, produced and directed the 1964 horror film The Flesh Eaters, and wrote lyrics for several musicals. He won 1967 Alley Awards for Best Full-Length Story and Best New Strip (both for Deadman in Strange Adventures), as well as the Bill Finger Award for Excellence in Comics Writing.

Steve Gerber (1947-2008) first came to attention writing Defenders, in which he gave the non-team a non-traditional outlook equaled by few. In Adventure of Fear, he introduced Howard the Duck. Gerber’s other 1970s contributions included scripts for Iron Man, Sub-Mariner and more. Elsewhere, he is equally well-remembered for DC’s Phantom Zone, Eclipse’s Destroyer Duck and others.

Roger Stern enjoyed well-regarded runs on Amazing Spider-Man, in which he introduced Captain Marvel (Monica Rambeau) and the Hobgoblin; Avengers; and Captain America. He launched West Coast Avengers and wrote numerous tie-in miniseries starring Earth’s Mightiest Heroes. At DC, he relaunched Atom and co-created Starman (Will Payton) before participating in one of comics’ most shocking events: the 1992 “Death of Superman.” He later returned to Marvel to write Amazing Spider-Man and related titles.

The unique, shadowy style of Gene Colan (1926-2011) most memorably appeared in long stints on Captain America and Daredevil, and all 70 issues of Tomb of Dracula — among the dozens of other Marvel titles he has drawn. His DC work on Detective Comics and Night Force is equally well remembered. During the Golden Age, he drew multiple war stories for Marvel and DC alike. Colan has earned several Eagle Awards and had professional art showings in New York City. His work on Ed Brubaker’s Captain America at the age of 82 drew well-deserved raves.

After a start as inker to his older brother John, Sal Buscema penciled Captain America, Defenders, Incredible Hulk and more. Famed for his ability to meet tight deadlines, he spread his talents across multiple genres. His 1970s work ranged from Ms. Marvel and Nova to Sub-Mariner and Spider-Woman’s first appearance in Marvel Spotlight. He was the uninterrupted artist on Spectacular Spider-Man for more than 100 issues and penciled the web-slinger’s adventures in Marvel Team-Up, in which he and writer Bill Mantlo introduced Captain Jean DeWolff. After handling more team-ups in the Thing’s Marvel Two-in-One, he reunited with brother John on Steve Englehart’s Fantastic Four. He later provided inks for Tom DeFalco’s Spider-Girl titles and Thunderstrike miniseries.

Don Heck (1929-1995) worked for Harvey, Quality, Hillman and other publishers before arriving at Atlas Comics, later Marvel, where he penciled and inked stories for virtually every genre: crime, horror, jungle, romance, war, Western and more. With Stan Lee and others, he launched Iron Man, his supporting cast and his early rogues gallery — including the Black Widow, Hawkeye and the Mandarin. He also succeeded Jack Kirby on Avengers. At DC, his artwork appeared in Justice League of America, Flash, Wonder Woman and other titles.